ICRP http://www.icrp.org/index.asp International Commission on Radiological Protection en-gb Mon, 24 Sep 2018 23:11:19 +0000 Draft Report on Adult Mesh-Type Reference Computational Phantoms Now Available for Public Consultation http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=397 <p>The draft&nbsp;<strong>Adult Mesh-type Reference Computational Phantoms</strong>&nbsp;is now available for public consultation on our <a href="page.asp?id=395">website</a>. We welcome comments from individuals and organisations. The draft document can be downloaded from the ICRP website. Comments must be submitted through the ICRP website no later than <strong>December 14, 2018.</strong></p> <p>Questions and inquiries can be directed towards&nbsp;<a style="background-image: url('mailtoicon.gif'); background-color: #ffffff;" href="mailto:kelsey.cloutier@icrp.org">Kelsey Cloutier</a>, Development and Communications Manager.</p> <h3>Abstract</h3> <p>Following the issuance of new radiological protection recommendations in Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007), the Commission released, in Publication 110 (ICRP, 2009), the adult male and female voxel-type reference computational phantoms to be used for the calculation of the reference dose coefficients for both external and internal exposures. While providing more anatomically realistic representations of internal anatomy than the older stylised phantoms, the voxel phantoms have their limitations, mainly due to voxel resolution, especially with respect to small tissue structures (e.g. lens of the eye) and very thin tissue layers (e.g. stem cell layers in the stomach wall mucosa and intestinal epithelium). This report describes the construction of the adult mesh-type reference computational phantoms (MRCPs) that are the modelling counterparts of the Publication 110 voxel-type reference computational phantoms. The MRCPs include all source and target regions needed for estimating effective dose, even the &mu;m-thick target regions in the respiratory and alimentary tract, skin, and urinary bladder, thereby obviating the need for supplemental stylised models. The MRCPs can be directly implemented into Monte Carlo particle transport codes for dose calculations, i.e. without voxelisation, fully maintaining the advantages of the mesh geometry. Dose coefficients (DCs) of organ dose and effective dose and specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) calculated with the MRCPs for some external and internal exposures show that &minus; while some differences were observed for small tissue structures and for weakly penetrating radiation &minus; the MRCPs provide the same or very similar values as the previously published reference DCs and SAFs for most tissues and penetrating radiations; consequently, the DCs for effective dose, i.e. the fundamental protection quantity, were found not to be different. The DCs of Publications 116 (ICRP, 2010) and the SAFs of Publication 133 (ICRP, 2016) thus remain valid. To demonstrate deformability of the MRCPs in this report, the phantoms were transformed to construct phantoms that represent the 10th and 90th percentiles of body height and weight for the Caucasian population. The constructed non-reference phantoms were then used to calculate DCs for industrial radiography sources near the body, which can be used to estimate organ doses of workers accidentally exposed by these sources, and which reflect the stature of the exposed worker. The MRCPs of this report were also transformed to phantoms that represent different postures (walking, sitting, bending, kneeling, and squatting), which were then used to evaluate variations in the DCs from the traditional up-right standing position.&nbsp;</p> Thu, 13 Sep 2018 15:15:04 +0000 ICRP 2017 Annual Report Released http://www.icrp.org/docs/ICRP 2017 Annual Report.pdf http://www.irpa.net/docs/ICRP 2017 Annual Report.pdf Tue, 11 Sep 2018 12:45:06 +0000 ICRP Chair Claire Cousins to Participate in Canadian Webinar on Lens of the Eye http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=396 <p>The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) and the&nbsp;Canadian Radiation Protection Association (CRPA)&nbsp;will host a webinar on September 27, 2018 on the implementation of ICRP's dose limits for the lens of the eye. This is the second in a series of webinars on this subject. It will present expert opinions and perspectives behind the implementation of dose limits.</p> <p>ICRP Chair Claire Cousins will present on&nbsp;the practical challenges both for eye lens protection and how to measure the doses received.&nbsp; Marie-Claire Cantone, Professor at the University of Milan and member of Committee 3, will also be featured in the webinar.</p> <p>Intersted parties are encouraged to visit <a href="http://nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/acts-and-regulations/consultation/history/dis-13-01-webinar.cfm">CNSC's website</a> for further information and register.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Questions and inquiries can be directed to <a href="mailto:kelsey.cloutier@icrp.org">Kelsey Cloutier</a>, Development and Communications Manager.</p> Mon, 10 Sep 2018 13:37:01 +0000 Draft Report on Paediatric Reference Computational Phantoms Now Available http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=393 <p>The draft <strong>Paediatric Reference Computational Phantoms</strong>&nbsp;is now available for public consultation. We welcome comments from individuals and organisations. The draft document can be downloaded from the ICRP website. Comments must be submitted through the ICRP website no later than <strong>November 9, 2018</strong></p> <p>Questions and inquiries can be directed towards <a href="mailto:kelsey.cloutier@icrp.org">Kelsey Cloutier</a>, Development and Communications Manager.</p> <h3>Abstract</h3> <p>This report describes the development and intended use of a series of ten computational phantoms representing the reference male and female at newborn, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, 10-year-old, and 15-year-old as defined in Publication 89. These phantoms have been formally adopted by the ICRP for use within ICRP Committee 2 in the development of age-dependent dose coefficients following the 2007 Recommendations. They are presented in this report in the very same voxelized structures and tissue ID numbers as given in Publication 110 for the adult reference computational phantoms. These paediatric phantoms have been used by Task Group 90 of ICRP Committee 2 in the development of age-dependent dose coefficients representing external exposures to contaminated air, water, and soil. They have also been used by Task Group 96 of ICRP Committee 2 in the development of age-dependent specific absorbed fractions for internally emitted photons, electrons, alpha particles, and neutrons, in a manner similar to the adult SAF (Specific Absorbed Fraction) values given in Publication 133. These age-dependent SAF values are currently being utilized by Task Group 96 in the preparation of age-dependent dose coefficients for radionuclide ingestion and inhalation as part of the forthcoming EIR (Environmental Intakes of Radionuclide) publication series which updates the dose coefficients of ICRP Publications 56, 67, 71, and 72. Chapter 1 summarises the main reasons for constructing these phantoms &ndash; voxel phantoms that comply with the reference anatomical characteristics of the non-adult reference individuals presented in Publication 89. Chapter 2 reviews the body size/shape and organ-specific specifications of the ICRP paediatric reference phantoms. Chapter 3 presents in detail the methods of their construction which includes 9 specific steps in their development: (1) selection of CT tomographic data, (2) segmentation of those CT images, (3) body contour and organ modelling via NURBS/PM surfaces, (4) adjustments of outer body contour to match total body mass, (5) adjustments of individual organ values to match reference masses, (6) subdivision of the skeletal tissues, (7) voxelization of the NURBS/PM surfaces, (8) voxel retagging for lymphatic nodes and skeletal muscle, and (9) further modifications to bring the series of paediatric phantoms into a structure identical to that original established for the adult phantoms of Publication 110. Chapter 4 follows with a description of the ICRP paediatric reference phantoms including their main characteristics, skeletal source/target regions, regional blood distribution, and phantom limitations. The report is supported by a series of annexes. Annex A provides details on tissue ID numbers, tissue media, mass densities, and organ locations by both coordinate position and voxel count. Annex B provides a complete list of the various age-dependent and gender-dependent tissue media, their phantom masses, and elemental compositions. Annexes C and D provide a listing of all source and target regions, respectively, needed for internal as well as external dosimetry applications. Annexes E and F provide depth distributions and organ pair distance distributions, respectively, in a manner similar to that provided in Publication 110 for the adult phantoms. Annex G provides cross-sectional images &ndash; sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes. Finally, Annex H gives a description of the electronic files available for download and use of each of the 10 paediatric reference computational phantoms.</p> Tue, 7 Aug 2018 13:42:55 +0000 Draft Report on Dose Coefficients for External Exposures to Environmental Sources Now Available for Public Consultation http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=391 <p>The draft <strong>Dose Coefficients for External Exposures to Environmental Sources</strong>&nbsp;is now available for public consultation. We welcome comments from individuals and organisations. The draft document can be downloaded from the ICRP website. Comments must be submitted through the ICRP website no later than&nbsp;<strong>October 12, 2018</strong>.</p> <p>Questions and inquries can be directed towards&nbsp;<a href="mailto:kelsey.cloutier@icrp.org">Kelsey Cloutier</a>, Development and Communications Manager.</p> <h3>Abstract</h3> <p>This publication presents radionuclide-specific organ and effective dose rate coefficients for members of the public resulting from environmental external exposures to radionuclide emissions of both photons and electrons, calculated using computational phantoms representing the ICRP reference newborn, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, 10-year-old, 15- year-old, and adult males and females. Environmental radiation fields of monoenergetic photon and electron sources were firstly computed using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System) for source geometries representing environmental radionuclide exposures including planar sources on and within the ground at different depths (representing radionuclide ground contamination from fall-out or naturally occurring terrestrial sources), volumetric sources in air (representing a radioactive cloud), and uniformly distributed sources in simulated contaminated water. For the above geometries, the exposed reference individual is considered to be completely within the radiation field. Organ equivalent dose rate coefficients for monoenergetic photons and electrons were next computed employing the PHITS code thus simulating photon and electron interactions within the tissues and organs of the exposed reference individual. For quality assurance purposes, further cross-check calculations were performed using GEANT4, EGSnrc, MCNPX, MCNP6, and the Visible Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. From the monoenergetic values, nuclide-specific effective and organ equivalent dose rate coefficients for several radionuclides for the above environmental exposures were computed using the nuclear decay data from Publication 107. The coefficients are given as dose rates normalised to radionuclide concentrations in environmental media, such as radioactivity concentration, in units of nSv h-1 Bq-1 m-2 or nSv h-1 Bq-1 m-3 and can be re-normalised to ambient dose equivalent (Sv Sv-1) or air kerma (Sv Gy-1). The findings showed that, in general, the smaller the body mass of the phantom, the higher the organ and effective dose due to (1) closer proximity to the source (in the case of ground contamination) and (2) the smaller amount of body shielding of internal organs in the younger and smaller reference phantoms. The difference in effective dose between an adult and an infant is 60-140% at a photon energy of 50 keV, while it is less than 70% above a photon energy of 100 keV, where the smaller differences are observed for air submersion and the largest differences are observed for soil contamination on the surface of the ground. For realistic exposure situations of radionuclide environmental contamination, the difference was found to be more moderate. For example, for radioactive caesium (134Cs, 136Cs, 137Cs/137mBa) deposited on and in the ground, the difference in effective dose between an adult and an infant was in the range of 20-60%, depending on the radioactivity deposition depth within the soil.</p> Tue, 10 Jul 2018 12:18:26 +0000 Update on Dose Coefficients for Internal Exposures to Workers and the Public http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=390 <p>Dose coefficients are essential to the practical implementation of the system of radiological protection. Significant progress is being made on preparing a comprehensive set of dose coefficients for occupational and public internal exposure based on <a href="publication.asp?id=ICRP%20Publication%20103">ICRP <em>Publication 103</em></a>.</p> <p>Dose coefficients rely on physical data and anatomical and biokinetic models. <em><a href="publication.asp?id=ICRP%20Publication%20107">Publication 107</a></em> provides nuclear decay data. <em><a href="publication.asp?id=ICRP%20Publication%20110">Publication 110</a></em> presents adult reference computational phantoms using voxels (three-dimensional pixels) to define organs and tissues within the body. Using these phantoms, <em><a href="publication.asp?id=ICRP%20Publication%20133">Publication 133</a></em>&nbsp;provides Specific Absorbed Fractions, an important intermediate step&nbsp;in the calculation of organ and tissue doses from radionuclides retained in body tissues.</p> <p>The Occupational Intakes of Radionuclide (OIR) series of publications presents biokinetic models, using these along with decay data and the adult voxel phantoms with their SAFs to calculate dose coefficients for occupational exposure.<em><a href="publication.asp?id=ICRP%20Publication%20130">Publication 130</a></em> (OIR part 1) describes the methodology. <em><a href="publication.asp?id=ICRP%20Publication%20134">Publication 134</a></em> (OIR part 2) and <em><a href="publication.asp?id=ICRP%20Publication%20137">Publication 137</a></em> (OIR part 3) provide dose coefficients and bioassay data for:&nbsp; H, C, P, S, Ca, Fe, Co, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Tc in OIR part 2, and: Ru, Sb, Te, I, Cs, Ba, Ir, Pb, Bi, Po, Rn, Ra, Th, and U in OIR part 3.</p> <p>OIR part 4 is nearing completion, covering: La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Ac, Pa, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, and Fm. OIR part 5 will cover the remaining, less commonly encountered elements and radioisotopes. This last report in the OIR series will take additional time to complete as biokinetic data are difficult to obtain.</p> <p>Dose coefficients for public exposure are also underway. These require anatomical models for adults, infants, and children, as well as the pregnant woman and embryo/fetus. These computational phantoms are complete and will be published soon, followed by a publication providing SAF values. They, and the already published adult phantoms, are already being used to compute dose coefficients for public exposure to adults, infants, and children of various ages. These will be published in two parts, one covering the elements in OIR parts 2-4, and one covering the elements in OIR part 5. The former should be published shortly after OIR part 4, while the latter, like OIR part 5, will take additional time. Dose coefficients will also be published for the embryo/fetus, and the breast-fed infant.</p> <p>For more information on dose coefficients, see the <a href="http://www.icrpaedia.org/index.php/ICRP%C3%A6dia_Guide_to_Dose_Coefficients">ICRP&aelig;dia Guide to Dose Coefficients</a>.</p> Tue, 10 Jul 2018 00:06:44 +0000 Draft Report on Radiological Protection in Therapy with Radiopharmaceuticals Now Available http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=387 <p>The draft <strong>Radiological Protection in Therapy with Radiopharmaceuticals</strong> is now available for public consultation. We welcome comments from individuals and organisations. The draft document can be downloaded from the <a href="page.asp?id=386">ICRP website</a>. Comments must be submitted through the ICRP website no later than <strong>September 21, 2018</strong>.<br style="font-size: 12px;" /></p> <p>Questions and inquries can be directed towards <a href="mailto:kelsey.cloutier@icrp.org">Kelsey Cloutier</a>, Development and Communications Manager.</p> <h3>Abstract</h3> <p>The use of radiopharmaceuticals for therapy using novel radionuclides, compounds, tracer molecules, and the administration techniques is increasing for the treatment of various tumours. The goal of radiation therapy, including therapy with radiopharmaceuticals, is to optimise the relationship between the probability of control of tumour/target tissue and complications in normal tissue. Essential to this optimisation is ability to quantify radiation dose to both tumour/target tissue and normal tissue. This report provides a framework for calculating radiation doses for various treatment approaches. In radiopharmaceutical therapy, the absorbed dose in an organ or tissue is governed by the radiopharmaceutical uptake, retention in and clearance from the various organs and tissues of the body, together with radionuclide physical half-life. These biokinetic data are based on measurements made using techniques that vary in complexity and the required accuracy will depend on the specific application. For treatment planning, absorbed dose calculations are performed prior to therapy using a trace-labelled diagnostic administration, or post-therapy on the basis of the therapy administration. Uncertainty analyses provide additional information about sources of bias and random variation and their magnitudes; these analyses show the reliability and quality of absorbed dose calculations. Effective dose can provide a measure of lifetime risk of detriment attributable to the stochastic effects of radiation exposure, principally cancer, but effective dose does not apply to short-term deterministic effects associated with radiopharmaceutical therapy. Accident prevention in radiation therapy should be an integral part of the design of facilities, equipment, and administration procedures. Optimisation of staff exposures includes consideration of equipment design, proper shielding and handling of sources, and personal protective equipment and tools, as well as education and training to promote awareness and engagement in radiation protection. The decision to hold or release a patient after radiopharmaceutical therapy should take account of estimates of possible radiation dose to members of the general public and carers from residual activity in the patient. In these situations, specific radiation protection guidance should be provided to patients and caregivers.</p> Thu, 14 Jun 2018 12:19:08 +0000 Former Main Commission Member Hans-Georg Menzel Delivered Prestigious Lecture http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=385 <p>On March 5, 2018 Former Main Commisson Member and Committee 2 Chair Hans-Georg Menzel delivered the 42nd Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture at the 2018 annual meeting of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).</p> <p>It was the 54th annual meeting of the NCRP, held at the Hyatt Regency in Bethesda, Maryland, and his lecture was titled "Radiation Dosimetry Research for Medicine and Protection: A European Journey".&nbsp; The lecture series was founded to honour the late Dr. Lauriston S. Taylor, NCRP Founding President (1929-1977) and President Emeritus (1977-2004).</p> <p>Dr. Menzel served as Chair of Committee 2 from 2007 until 2013, and continued his role as a member of the Main Commission until 2017.&nbsp;</p> <p>More infomation on Hans, the lecture, and the meeting can be found in <a href="https://ncrponline.org/wp-content/themes/ncrp/PDFs/Press_Rel/2017/Menzel-LST.pdf">NCRP's press release</a>.</p> <p>All questions and inquiries can be directed towards <a href="mailto:kelsey.cloutier@icrp.org">Kelsey Cloutier</a>, Development and Communications Manager.</p> Mon, 11 Jun 2018 15:02:22 +0000 ICRP Welcomes New Intern: Sunny Siu http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=384 <p> <p>On May 8th, ICRP welcomed Sunny Siu to the Scientific Secretariat.</p> <p>The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) have graciously provided support to the ICRP Scientific Secretariat team through the professional development program for students and this will be his first four-month rotation in Ottawa.</p> <p>Sunny has prior experience in the Health Physics Department at the McMaster Nuclear Reactor, Hamilton and Darlington&rsquo;s Refurbishment in Radiation Protection at Ontario Power Generation, Bowmanville.</p> <p>From the Windsor, Ontario area, Sunny has traveled throughout the province in his academic and professional career. Studying at McMaster University with a background in Health Physics and special interest in Nuclear Engineering and Reactor Physics, he has one semester left before a BSc in Medical and Health Physics.</p> <p>While at ICRP, Sunny will be assisting with the Scientific Secretariat, performing various tasks alongside the team.</p> <p>Once again, thank you to the CNSC for their partnership, collaboration, and support.</p> <p>Welcome Sunny!</p> </p> Mon, 14 May 2018 17:28:56 +0000 Summary of April 2018 Main Commission Meeting Now Available http://www.icrp.org/admin/Summary%20of%20April%202018%20Main%20Commission%20Meeting%20Quebec%20City.pdf http://www.irpa.net/admin/Summary%20of%20April%202018%20Main%20Commission%20Meeting%20Quebec%20City.pdf Fri, 11 May 2018 19:15:03 +0000 Passing of Former Main Commission Member Rudolf Mikhailovich Aleksakhin http://www.icrp.org/docs/Passing of Former Main Commission Member Rudolf Mikhailovich Aleksakhin.pdf http://www.irpa.net/docs/Passing of Former Main Commission Member Rudolf Mikhailovich Aleksakhin.pdf Wed, 9 May 2018 13:07:09 +0000 First Ever Bo Lindell Medal Awarded to Nicole E Martinez http://www.icrp.org/docs/First Ever Bo Lindell Medal Awarded to Nicole E Martinez.pdf http://www.irpa.net/docs/First Ever Bo Lindell Medal Awarded to Nicole E Martinez.pdf Mon, 7 May 2018 18:20:40 +0000 ICRP and ICRU to Celebrate Respective 90th Anniversaries in Stockholm http://www.icrp.org/docs/invitation-icrp.pdf http://www.irpa.net/docs/invitation-icrp.pdf Fri, 4 May 2018 13:40:14 +0000 Draft Report on Effective Dose Now Available for Public Consulation http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=383 <p>The draft report on <strong>The Use of Effective Dose as a Radiological Protection Quantity</strong> is now available for public consultation. We welcome comments from individuals and organisations. The draft document can be downloaded from the <a href="page.asp?id=382">ICRP website</a>. Comments must be submitted through the ICRP website no later than <strong>August 3, 2018</strong>.</p> <p>Questions and inquries can be directed towards <a href="mailto:kelsey.cloutier@icrp.org">Kelsey Cloutier</a>, Development and Communications Manager.</p> <h3>Abstract</h3> <p>The concept of ‘effective dose’ (E) was developed by ICRP as a risk-adjusted dosimetric quantity for the management of protection against stochastic effects, principally cancer, enabling comparison of planned or received doses with dose limits, dose constraints, and reference levels expressed in the same quantity. Its use allows all radiation exposures 92 from external and internal sources to be considered together and summed, relying on the assumptions of a linear-non-threshold dose-response relationship, equivalence of acute and chronic exposures at low doses or low dose rates, and equivalence of external and internal exposures. Considering exposures incurred by patients during medical procedures, E is of practical value for comparing: doses from different diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures; the use of similar technologies and procedures in different hospitals and countries; and the use of different technologies for the same medical examination, provided that the representative patients or patient populations for which the effective doses are derived are similar with regard to age and sex. As stated in the 2007 Recommendations (ICRP, 2007a), “… risk assessment for medical diagnosis and treatment … is best evaluated using appropriate risk values for the individual tissues at risk and for the age and sex distribution of the individuals undergoing the medical procedures”. Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007a) provides detailed explanation of the purpose and use of E and of equivalent dose to individual organs and tissues. However, questions have arisen regarding practical applications, highlighting a clear need for further guidance on specific aspects. This publication draws on the explanations provided in Publication 103 and emphasises that E has proved a valuable and robust quantity for use in the optimisation of protection, to set dose criteria and verify compliance. Conclusions are drawn that: a) Equivalent dose (H) is not required as a protection quantity. It will be more appropriate for limits for the avoidance of tissue reactions for the hands and feet, lens of the eye, and skin, to be set in terms of absorbed dose (Gy) rather than equivalent dose (Sv). b) While risk assessments for individuals based on organ/tissue doses and specific dose-risk models make best use of scientific knowledge, E may be used as an approximate indicator of possible risk, recognising that this is a pragmatic, but unintended, application of effective dose. It is made clear in this report that while doses incurred at low levels of exposure may be measured or assessed with reasonable accuracy, the associated risks are increasingly uncertain at lower doses. However, bearing in mind the uncertainties associated with risk projection to low doses, E may be considered as an approximate indicator of possible risk, with the additional consideration of variation in risk with age, sex and population group. Use of E in this way is not a substitute for risk analysis using best estimates of organ/tissue doses, appropriate information on the relative effectiveness of different radiation types, and age-, sex- and population-specific risk factors, with consideration of uncertainties.</p> Thu, 26 Apr 2018 17:48:00 +0000 ICRP Welcomes New Assistant Scientific Secretary Chunsheng Li http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=381 <p>Effective April 3, 2018, Dr Chunsheng Li joined Dr Hiroki Fujita as an additional Scientific Secretary at ICRP.</p> <p>Our kindest thanks to Health Canada (HC) for providing this resource.&nbsp; Dr Li joins ICRP from the Radiation Protection Bureau of HC.</p> <p>Chunsheng received his PhD in Radiochemsitry in 1998 from the Chinese Acadamey of Sciences.&nbsp; He has been working for Health Canada since 1999 as a scientiest on monitoring, dosimetry and medical management of internal radiation contamination.&nbsp; Additionally, Chunsheng has been an adjunct professor at Carleton University in Ottawa since 2010.&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">ICRP is fortunate to have Chunsheng's many years of experience and dedication to the field Radiolgoical Protection.&nbsp; Welcome Chunsheng!</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Questions and inquiries can be directed to <a href="mailto:kelsey.cloutier@icrp,org">Kelsey Cloutier</a>, Develomepment and Comminucations Manager for ICRP.</span></p> <div></div> Mon, 9 Apr 2018 17:50:31 +0000 Passing of Former Main Commission Member Roger Berry http://www.icrp.org/docs/Passing of Former Main Commission Member Roger Berry.pdf http://www.irpa.net/docs/Passing of Former Main Commission Member Roger Berry.pdf Tue, 3 Apr 2018 19:05:51 +0000 Passing of Former Main Commission Member Julian Liniecki http://www.icrp.org/docs/Passing of Former Main Commission Member Julian Liniecki.pdf http://www.irpa.net/docs/Passing of Former Main Commission Member Julian Liniecki.pdf Mon, 26 Mar 2018 17:49:54 +0000 Publication 139, Occupational Radiological Protection in Interventional Procedures, Now Available http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=380 <p>Last week, Publication 139 on Occupational Radiological Protection in Interventional Procedures was released on our <a href="publication.asp?id=ICRP%20Publication%20139">website</a>.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Questions and inquiries can be directed to <a href="mailto:kelsey.cloutier@icrp.org">Kelsey Cloutier</a>, Development and Communications Manager.</p> <p><strong style="font-size: 12px;">Abstract -</strong><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;In recent publications, such as Publications 117 and 120, the Commission provided practical advice for physicians and other healthcare personnel on measures to protect their patients and themselves during interventional procedures. These measures can only be effective if they are encompassed by a framework of radiological protection elements, and by the availability of professionals with responsibilities in radiological protection. This framework includes a radiological protection programme with a strategy for exposure monitoring, protective garments, education and training, and quality assurance of the programme implementation. Professionals with responsibilities in occupational radiological protection for interventional procedures include: medical physicists; radiological protection specialists; personnel working in dosimetry services; clinical applications support personnel from the suppliers and maintenance companies; staff engaged in training, standardisation of equipment, and procedures; staff responsible for occupational health; hospital administrators responsible for providing financial support; and professional bodies and regulators. This publication addresses these elements and these audiences, and provides advice on specific issues, such as assessment of effective dose from dosimeter readings when an apron is worn, estimation of exposure of the lens of the eye (with and without protective eyewear), extremity monitoring, selection and testing of protective garments, and auditing the interventional procedures when occupational doses are unusually high or low (the latter meaning that the dosimeter may not have been worn).</span></p> Mon, 19 Mar 2018 14:31:31 +0000 ICRP Welcomes New Assistant Scientific Secretary Hiroki Fujita http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=378 <p>Effective March 5, 2018, Dr Hiroki Fujita serves as one of the new Assistant Scientific Secretary's at ICRP.</p> <p>For the first time, the Assistant Scientific Secretary is from the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), and will last for a term of three years.&nbsp; We're excited about this new relationship with JAEA, and must thank CRIEPI Radiation Research Safety Center, who gracioulsy supported this role over a six year span, through three quality experts in two-year intervals.</p> <p>Hiroki received his Doctorate in Science from the University of Niigata, and comes to ICRP from the Radiation Protection Department, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Sector of Decomissioning and Radioactive Waste Management at JAEA.</p> <p>For the next few weeks, Hiroki will be training alongside current Assistant Scientific Secretary Haruyuki Ogino, who will return to Japan in the next few weeks.&nbsp; Haru has been an integral part of the ICRP family these last few years, and he will be surely missed.&nbsp; Our sincerest gratitude and thanks to Haru, and welcome Hiroki.</p> Wed, 7 Mar 2018 19:56:56 +0000 Publication 138, Ethical Foundations of the System of Radiological Protection, Now Available http://www.icrp.org/page.asp?id=377 <p>Last week, Publication 138 was published on our <a href="publication.asp?id=ICRP%20Publication%20138">website</a>, ending the long awaited release of Ethical Foundations of the System of Radiological Protection.</p> <p>Questions can be directed to <a href="mailto:kelsey.cloutier@icrp.org">Kelsey Cloutier</a>, Development and Communications Manager.</p> <p><strong>Abstract</strong> -&nbsp;Despite a longstanding recognition that radiological protection is not only a matter of science, but also ethics, ICRP publications have rarely addressed the ethical foundations of the system of radiological protection explicitly. The purpose of this publication is to describe how the Commission has relied on ethical values, either intentionally or indirectly, in developing the system of radiological protection with the objective of presenting a coherent view of how ethics is part of this system. In so doing, it helps to clarify the inherent value judgements made in achieving the aim of the radiological protection system as underlined by the Commission in Publication 103. Although primarily addressed to the radiological protection community, this publication is also intended to address authorities, operators, workers, medical professionals, patients, the public, and its representatives (e.g. NGOs) acting in the interest of the protection of people and the environment. This publication provides the key steps concerning the scientific, ethical, and practical evolutions of the system of radiological protection since the first ICRP publication in 1928. It then describes the four core ethical values underpinning the present system: beneficence/non-maleficence, prudence, justice, and dignity. It also discusses how these core ethical values relate to the principles of radiological protection, namely justification, optimisation, and limitation. The publication finally addresses key procedural values that are required for the practical implementation of the system, focusing on accountability, transparency, and inclusiveness. The Commission sees this publication as a founding document to be elaborated further in different situations and circumstances.<br style="font-size: 12px;" /></p> Mon, 26 Feb 2018 15:10:43 +0000